Purple Cow (Book Summary) : New era Marketing by being Purple cow

New era Marketing by being Purple cow
Image result for the purple cow

The Purple cow

Here are 3 lessons from the book:
  1. We live
    in the third era of advertising, where marketing is mainly done
    through word-of-mouth.
  2. Not
    taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
  3. If you
    want your product to succeed, focus on early adopters as your first
    customers.
Lesson
1: Today marketing is mainly done through word-of-mouth recommendations.
Seth walks us through the history of
advertising and says there were three distinct periods.
Before advertising was way back in ancient times, when people could
only spread the word about great deals with their mouths.
For example in ancient Rome, when
one of the vendors on the market sold particularly good fish, everyone who
bought one would of course tell all their friends and family. Likely, the next
time they’d go to the market, they’d visit that same vendor.
During advertising was the time during the 18- and 19-hundreds, when
advertising seemed to work like magic and the only limit to how much you could
sell through it was how much you were able to buy. Billboards, ads in
magazines, TV commercials, they all fall into this category.
But by now we’re in the era after
advertising. 
Consumers completely ignore ads now and are already
blind to banner ads online. Unless they’re looking for something specific,
for example a car, people won’t look at car ads.
In the era we are in right now,
we’ve gone back to word-of-mouth marketing, only that the word is now exchanged
online, which makes news about good and bad products spread a lot more quickly, thanks
to social media like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.
Lesson
2: Not taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
Because we live in a
post-advertising world and the internet is such a noisy place, you have to be
truly remarkable to stand out – like a purple cow among brown, black and white
cows.
Seth calls this remarkable marketing
and without it, your product is doomed to fail.
That’s why the riskiest thing you
and your company can do right now, is to not take any risks at all.
Following the trends and trying not
to make any noise, won’t make you stand out, it will make you invisible.
For example, Ford is a steady
company, but they’re not very innovative. They do what they know to do, again
and again, which is why their stock price has merely changed in 10 years. They’re
a boring company.
Take Porsche, and you see a company
that’s always at the edge. In 2013, Porsche took a massive risk with the
918 project (Please Google It for more details).
They built a car with hybrid
technology, which they’d never done before, the car cost eight times as much as
any of their normal models, and they limited production to 918 units.
But what they built was truly
remarkable, the car caught major attention for it’s space-style design and also set
an all time record on the Nurburgring.
The car completely sold out.
It’s your choice.
You can never take risks, and never
build something that’s so great everyone will eventually want it, or you can
work at the edge, occasionally fall, but rise all the higher in the long run.
Lesson
3: If you want your product to successfully reach the masses, focus on
early adopters first.
When I hear the word early
adopters, I always have to think of Simon Sinek and his talk.
The gist of it is that you need to
communicate why you do things (Purpose) before you tell people what you
do, because that’ll help get your product into the right people’s hands.
In both Seth’s and Simon’s case,
these people are called early adopters.
Traditional marketing shoots
its advertising right at the majority of people, when a new product comes
out. The mistake with this is that the majority isn’t ready for it yet
– they want a proven product, not some new gimmick
.
Instead, build your product in a way
that makes it attractive to innovators and early adopters, the tech
geeks, the people that stand in line for 24 hours to buy an iPhone, and let
them spread the word
.
When you do this and make sure that
your product is easily shareable, you’ll make sure your product eventually
reaches the masses through diffusion, and they won’t turn you down at the door.
The essence of the Purple Cow is about
being remarkable.  Remarkable products are worth talking about.  They
get noticed.  They’re exceptional, new, and interesting.  Remarkable
in marketing means that the product or service remarkable.  In that sense,
marketing isn’t an add on, but a part of the product cycle as well.  Godin
emphasizes that if it isn’t remarkable, it’s invisible.  It’s a brown or
white cow.  His Purple
Cow
 is about three pertinent
ideas: the why, the what, and the how of being remarkable.

1. Why be remarkable

The author states, using rational argument
and case examples, that being remarkable is a necessity of marketing.  His
“TV-industrial complex” system, is dying or dead.  Consumers are hard to
reach and they ignore mass advertising.  Godin offers multiple examples of
this (Please read book for the examples, they are worth reading).  Most
notable is the, often called, most popularly know television ad ever made: “I’d
like to teach the world to sing” by Coca-Cola.  Godin cites works of other
which argue that the commercial sold “not one more bottle of Coke.” 

2. What is remarkable

Godin lists some products or services
which are remarkable: Starbucks, Jet Blue, Sam Adams, and others. 
Remarkable is the insight to realize that there is no other choice to grow a
business or launch a product.  Passion is not a requisite.  Neither
is an extreme amount of creativity.  Godin gives the reader an
interestingly non-marketing example of remarkable: kiteboarding.  It is
one of the fastest growing sports today.  “Strap a surfboard to your feet,
hold onto a huge kite, and start racing across the water at thirty miles per
hour.  Unless, of course, you get dragged across the beach.” Dangerous and
new are worth talking about.  Remarkable is worth talking about.  It
is exceptional and worth noticing.

3. How to be remarkable

This is the core material of Purple Cow, literally and
figuratively.  It is the heftiest part of the book, and is filled with
case examples and stories (Please read the book for all the examples).  It
is, however, more of a listing of what not to do than what to do.  Godin’s
“how’s” become increasingly abstract, but three core beliefs stand out.
  • Firms must make more remarkable products and
    services that the “right” people (Micro niche segment of customers) seek
    out.  Creating safe and ordinary products and combining them with
    great marketing no longer works.
  • Purple Cows focus on early adopters
    of products.  Brown cows focus on the masses in the middle of the
    product life cycle.  But the masses also ignore new products. 
    The majority are happy with their choices and unlikely to change. 
    They are stuck consumers.
  • Beyond catering to the early adopters, Purple
    Cows can use them to spread ideas.  Godin calls them “idea viruses”
    and vocal early adopters “sneezers.”  They sneeze products and ideas
    and their friends catch on.  Ideasvirus items are occasionally the
    product of accidental luck; consider the Pet Rock and Psy’s Gangnam Style
    video.  More likely, however, it is the result of hard work and a
    focus on sneezers.  In fact, Godin states “It is useless to advertise
    to anyone except interested sneezers with influence.” 

Lessons learned

Purple Cow products are rare because they
are seen as risky, like kiteboarding.  The real problem with them is
fear.  Giant brands with large facilities and significant inertia have a
low tolerance for perceived risk.  Smaller and mid sized firms have less
to lose.  And, they realize they have far more to gain by playing by a
different set of marketing and conceptual rules.  Godin calls them
“cheaters.”  One example is Jet Blue.  They “cheat” by using a low
cost business structure, underused airports, and a younger non-union
staff.  This gives them an unfair advantage.  His take on this is
“who cares?”
“If Purple Cow is now
one of the Ps of marketing, it has profound implications for the enterprise. It
changes the definition of marketing. It used to be that Engineering invented,
Manufacturing built, Marketing marketed, and Sales sold. There was a clear
division of labor, and the president managed the whole shebang.” That’s clearly
not a valid strategy any longer the customer’s mind, creating Killer Brands.

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2rUF57a

Purple Cow (Book Summary) : New era Marketing by being Purple cow

New era Marketing by being Purple cow
Image result for the purple cow

The Purple cow

Here are 3 lessons from the book:
  1. We live
    in the third era of advertising, where marketing is mainly done
    through word-of-mouth.
  2. Not
    taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
  3. If you
    want your product to succeed, focus on early adopters as your first
    customers.
Lesson
1: Today marketing is mainly done through word-of-mouth recommendations.
Seth walks us through the history of
advertising and says there were three distinct periods.
Before advertising was way back in ancient times, when people could
only spread the word about great deals with their mouths.
For example in ancient Rome, when
one of the vendors on the market sold particularly good fish, everyone who
bought one would of course tell all their friends and family. Likely, the next
time they’d go to the market, they’d visit that same vendor.
During advertising was the time during the 18- and 19-hundreds, when
advertising seemed to work like magic and the only limit to how much you could
sell through it was how much you were able to buy. Billboards, ads in
magazines, TV commercials, they all fall into this category.
But by now we’re in the era after
advertising. 
Consumers completely ignore ads now and are already
blind to banner ads online. Unless they’re looking for something specific,
for example a car, people won’t look at car ads.
In the era we are in right now,
we’ve gone back to word-of-mouth marketing, only that the word is now exchanged
online, which makes news about good and bad products spread a lot more quickly, thanks
to social media like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.
Lesson
2: Not taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
Because we live in a
post-advertising world and the internet is such a noisy place, you have to be
truly remarkable to stand out – like a purple cow among brown, black and white
cows.
Seth calls this remarkable marketing
and without it, your product is doomed to fail.
That’s why the riskiest thing you
and your company can do right now, is to not take any risks at all.
Following the trends and trying not
to make any noise, won’t make you stand out, it will make you invisible.
For example, Ford is a steady
company, but they’re not very innovative. They do what they know to do, again
and again, which is why their stock price has merely changed in 10 years. They’re
a boring company.
Take Porsche, and you see a company
that’s always at the edge. In 2013, Porsche took a massive risk with the
918 project (Please Google It for more details).
They built a car with hybrid
technology, which they’d never done before, the car cost eight times as much as
any of their normal models, and they limited production to 918 units.
But what they built was truly
remarkable, the car caught major attention for it’s space-style design and also set
an all time record on the Nurburgring.
The car completely sold out.
It’s your choice.
You can never take risks, and never
build something that’s so great everyone will eventually want it, or you can
work at the edge, occasionally fall, but rise all the higher in the long run.
Lesson
3: If you want your product to successfully reach the masses, focus on
early adopters first.
When I hear the word early
adopters, I always have to think of Simon Sinek and his talk.
The gist of it is that you need to
communicate why you do things (Purpose) before you tell people what you
do, because that’ll help get your product into the right people’s hands.
In both Seth’s and Simon’s case,
these people are called early adopters.
Traditional marketing shoots
its advertising right at the majority of people, when a new product comes
out. The mistake with this is that the majority isn’t ready for it yet
– they want a proven product, not some new gimmick
.
Instead, build your product in a way
that makes it attractive to innovators and early adopters, the tech
geeks, the people that stand in line for 24 hours to buy an iPhone, and let
them spread the word
.
When you do this and make sure that
your product is easily shareable, you’ll make sure your product eventually
reaches the masses through diffusion, and they won’t turn you down at the door.
The essence of the Purple Cow is about
being remarkable.  Remarkable products are worth talking about.  They
get noticed.  They’re exceptional, new, and interesting.  Remarkable
in marketing means that the product or service remarkable.  In that sense,
marketing isn’t an add on, but a part of the product cycle as well.  Godin
emphasizes that if it isn’t remarkable, it’s invisible.  It’s a brown or
white cow.  His Purple
Cow
 is about three pertinent
ideas: the why, the what, and the how of being remarkable.

1. Why be remarkable

The author states, using rational argument
and case examples, that being remarkable is a necessity of marketing.  His
“TV-industrial complex” system, is dying or dead.  Consumers are hard to
reach and they ignore mass advertising.  Godin offers multiple examples of
this (Please read book for the examples, they are worth reading).  Most
notable is the, often called, most popularly know television ad ever made: “I’d
like to teach the world to sing” by Coca-Cola.  Godin cites works of other
which argue that the commercial sold “not one more bottle of Coke.” 

2. What is remarkable

Godin lists some products or services
which are remarkable: Starbucks, Jet Blue, Sam Adams, and others. 
Remarkable is the insight to realize that there is no other choice to grow a
business or launch a product.  Passion is not a requisite.  Neither
is an extreme amount of creativity.  Godin gives the reader an
interestingly non-marketing example of remarkable: kiteboarding.  It is
one of the fastest growing sports today.  “Strap a surfboard to your feet,
hold onto a huge kite, and start racing across the water at thirty miles per
hour.  Unless, of course, you get dragged across the beach.” Dangerous and
new are worth talking about.  Remarkable is worth talking about.  It
is exceptional and worth noticing.

3. How to be remarkable

This is the core material of Purple Cow, literally and
figuratively.  It is the heftiest part of the book, and is filled with
case examples and stories (Please read the book for all the examples).  It
is, however, more of a listing of what not to do than what to do.  Godin’s
“how’s” become increasingly abstract, but three core beliefs stand out.
  • Firms must make more remarkable products and
    services that the “right” people (Micro niche segment of customers) seek
    out.  Creating safe and ordinary products and combining them with
    great marketing no longer works.
  • Purple Cows focus on early adopters
    of products.  Brown cows focus on the masses in the middle of the
    product life cycle.  But the masses also ignore new products. 
    The majority are happy with their choices and unlikely to change. 
    They are stuck consumers.
  • Beyond catering to the early adopters, Purple
    Cows can use them to spread ideas.  Godin calls them “idea viruses”
    and vocal early adopters “sneezers.”  They sneeze products and ideas
    and their friends catch on.  Ideasvirus items are occasionally the
    product of accidental luck; consider the Pet Rock and Psy’s Gangnam Style
    video.  More likely, however, it is the result of hard work and a
    focus on sneezers.  In fact, Godin states “It is useless to advertise
    to anyone except interested sneezers with influence.” 

Lessons learned

Purple Cow products are rare because they
are seen as risky, like kiteboarding.  The real problem with them is
fear.  Giant brands with large facilities and significant inertia have a
low tolerance for perceived risk.  Smaller and mid sized firms have less
to lose.  And, they realize they have far more to gain by playing by a
different set of marketing and conceptual rules.  Godin calls them
“cheaters.”  One example is Jet Blue.  They “cheat” by using a low
cost business structure, underused airports, and a younger non-union
staff.  This gives them an unfair advantage.  His take on this is
“who cares?”
“If Purple Cow is now
one of the Ps of marketing, it has profound implications for the enterprise. It
changes the definition of marketing. It used to be that Engineering invented,
Manufacturing built, Marketing marketed, and Sales sold. There was a clear
division of labor, and the president managed the whole shebang.” That’s clearly
not a valid strategy any longer the customer’s mind, creating Killer Brands.

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2rUF57a

Purple Cow (Book Summary) : New era Marketing by being Purple cow

New era Marketing by being Purple cow
Image result for the purple cow

The Purple cow

Here are 3 lessons from the book:
  1. We live
    in the third era of advertising, where marketing is mainly done
    through word-of-mouth.
  2. Not
    taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
  3. If you
    want your product to succeed, focus on early adopters as your first
    customers.
Lesson
1: Today marketing is mainly done through word-of-mouth recommendations.
Seth walks us through the history of
advertising and says there were three distinct periods.
Before advertising was way back in ancient times, when people could
only spread the word about great deals with their mouths.
For example in ancient Rome, when
one of the vendors on the market sold particularly good fish, everyone who
bought one would of course tell all their friends and family. Likely, the next
time they’d go to the market, they’d visit that same vendor.
During advertising was the time during the 18- and 19-hundreds, when
advertising seemed to work like magic and the only limit to how much you could
sell through it was how much you were able to buy. Billboards, ads in
magazines, TV commercials, they all fall into this category.
But by now we’re in the era after
advertising. 
Consumers completely ignore ads now and are already
blind to banner ads online. Unless they’re looking for something specific,
for example a car, people won’t look at car ads.
In the era we are in right now,
we’ve gone back to word-of-mouth marketing, only that the word is now exchanged
online, which makes news about good and bad products spread a lot more quickly, thanks
to social media like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.
Lesson
2: Not taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
Because we live in a
post-advertising world and the internet is such a noisy place, you have to be
truly remarkable to stand out – like a purple cow among brown, black and white
cows.
Seth calls this remarkable marketing
and without it, your product is doomed to fail.
That’s why the riskiest thing you
and your company can do right now, is to not take any risks at all.
Following the trends and trying not
to make any noise, won’t make you stand out, it will make you invisible.
For example, Ford is a steady
company, but they’re not very innovative. They do what they know to do, again
and again, which is why their stock price has merely changed in 10 years. They’re
a boring company.
Take Porsche, and you see a company
that’s always at the edge. In 2013, Porsche took a massive risk with the
918 project (Please Google It for more details).
They built a car with hybrid
technology, which they’d never done before, the car cost eight times as much as
any of their normal models, and they limited production to 918 units.
But what they built was truly
remarkable, the car caught major attention for it’s space-style design and also set
an all time record on the Nurburgring.
The car completely sold out.
It’s your choice.
You can never take risks, and never
build something that’s so great everyone will eventually want it, or you can
work at the edge, occasionally fall, but rise all the higher in the long run.
Lesson
3: If you want your product to successfully reach the masses, focus on
early adopters first.
When I hear the word early
adopters, I always have to think of Simon Sinek and his talk.
The gist of it is that you need to
communicate why you do things (Purpose) before you tell people what you
do, because that’ll help get your product into the right people’s hands.
In both Seth’s and Simon’s case,
these people are called early adopters.
Traditional marketing shoots
its advertising right at the majority of people, when a new product comes
out. The mistake with this is that the majority isn’t ready for it yet
– they want a proven product, not some new gimmick
.
Instead, build your product in a way
that makes it attractive to innovators and early adopters, the tech
geeks, the people that stand in line for 24 hours to buy an iPhone, and let
them spread the word
.
When you do this and make sure that
your product is easily shareable, you’ll make sure your product eventually
reaches the masses through diffusion, and they won’t turn you down at the door.
The essence of the Purple Cow is about
being remarkable.  Remarkable products are worth talking about.  They
get noticed.  They’re exceptional, new, and interesting.  Remarkable
in marketing means that the product or service remarkable.  In that sense,
marketing isn’t an add on, but a part of the product cycle as well.  Godin
emphasizes that if it isn’t remarkable, it’s invisible.  It’s a brown or
white cow.  His Purple
Cow
 is about three pertinent
ideas: the why, the what, and the how of being remarkable.

1. Why be remarkable

The author states, using rational argument
and case examples, that being remarkable is a necessity of marketing.  His
“TV-industrial complex” system, is dying or dead.  Consumers are hard to
reach and they ignore mass advertising.  Godin offers multiple examples of
this (Please read book for the examples, they are worth reading).  Most
notable is the, often called, most popularly know television ad ever made: “I’d
like to teach the world to sing” by Coca-Cola.  Godin cites works of other
which argue that the commercial sold “not one more bottle of Coke.” 

2. What is remarkable

Godin lists some products or services
which are remarkable: Starbucks, Jet Blue, Sam Adams, and others. 
Remarkable is the insight to realize that there is no other choice to grow a
business or launch a product.  Passion is not a requisite.  Neither
is an extreme amount of creativity.  Godin gives the reader an
interestingly non-marketing example of remarkable: kiteboarding.  It is
one of the fastest growing sports today.  “Strap a surfboard to your feet,
hold onto a huge kite, and start racing across the water at thirty miles per
hour.  Unless, of course, you get dragged across the beach.” Dangerous and
new are worth talking about.  Remarkable is worth talking about.  It
is exceptional and worth noticing.

3. How to be remarkable

This is the core material of Purple Cow, literally and
figuratively.  It is the heftiest part of the book, and is filled with
case examples and stories (Please read the book for all the examples).  It
is, however, more of a listing of what not to do than what to do.  Godin’s
“how’s” become increasingly abstract, but three core beliefs stand out.
  • Firms must make more remarkable products and
    services that the “right” people (Micro niche segment of customers) seek
    out.  Creating safe and ordinary products and combining them with
    great marketing no longer works.
  • Purple Cows focus on early adopters
    of products.  Brown cows focus on the masses in the middle of the
    product life cycle.  But the masses also ignore new products. 
    The majority are happy with their choices and unlikely to change. 
    They are stuck consumers.
  • Beyond catering to the early adopters, Purple
    Cows can use them to spread ideas.  Godin calls them “idea viruses”
    and vocal early adopters “sneezers.”  They sneeze products and ideas
    and their friends catch on.  Ideasvirus items are occasionally the
    product of accidental luck; consider the Pet Rock and Psy’s Gangnam Style
    video.  More likely, however, it is the result of hard work and a
    focus on sneezers.  In fact, Godin states “It is useless to advertise
    to anyone except interested sneezers with influence.” 

Lessons learned

Purple Cow products are rare because they
are seen as risky, like kiteboarding.  The real problem with them is
fear.  Giant brands with large facilities and significant inertia have a
low tolerance for perceived risk.  Smaller and mid sized firms have less
to lose.  And, they realize they have far more to gain by playing by a
different set of marketing and conceptual rules.  Godin calls them
“cheaters.”  One example is Jet Blue.  They “cheat” by using a low
cost business structure, underused airports, and a younger non-union
staff.  This gives them an unfair advantage.  His take on this is
“who cares?”
“If Purple Cow is now
one of the Ps of marketing, it has profound implications for the enterprise. It
changes the definition of marketing. It used to be that Engineering invented,
Manufacturing built, Marketing marketed, and Sales sold. There was a clear
division of labor, and the president managed the whole shebang.” That’s clearly
not a valid strategy any longer the customer’s mind, creating Killer Brands.

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2rUF57a

Purple Cow (Book Summary) : New era Marketing by being Purple cow

New era Marketing by being Purple cow
Image result for the purple cow

The Purple cow

Here are 3 lessons from the book:
  1. We live
    in the third era of advertising, where marketing is mainly done
    through word-of-mouth.
  2. Not
    taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
  3. If you
    want your product to succeed, focus on early adopters as your first
    customers.
Lesson
1: Today marketing is mainly done through word-of-mouth recommendations.
Seth walks us through the history of
advertising and says there were three distinct periods.
Before advertising was way back in ancient times, when people could
only spread the word about great deals with their mouths.
For example in ancient Rome, when
one of the vendors on the market sold particularly good fish, everyone who
bought one would of course tell all their friends and family. Likely, the next
time they’d go to the market, they’d visit that same vendor.
During advertising was the time during the 18- and 19-hundreds, when
advertising seemed to work like magic and the only limit to how much you could
sell through it was how much you were able to buy. Billboards, ads in
magazines, TV commercials, they all fall into this category.
But by now we’re in the era after
advertising. 
Consumers completely ignore ads now and are already
blind to banner ads online. Unless they’re looking for something specific,
for example a car, people won’t look at car ads.
In the era we are in right now,
we’ve gone back to word-of-mouth marketing, only that the word is now exchanged
online, which makes news about good and bad products spread a lot more quickly, thanks
to social media like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.
Lesson
2: Not taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
Because we live in a
post-advertising world and the internet is such a noisy place, you have to be
truly remarkable to stand out – like a purple cow among brown, black and white
cows.
Seth calls this remarkable marketing
and without it, your product is doomed to fail.
That’s why the riskiest thing you
and your company can do right now, is to not take any risks at all.
Following the trends and trying not
to make any noise, won’t make you stand out, it will make you invisible.
For example, Ford is a steady
company, but they’re not very innovative. They do what they know to do, again
and again, which is why their stock price has merely changed in 10 years. They’re
a boring company.
Take Porsche, and you see a company
that’s always at the edge. In 2013, Porsche took a massive risk with the
918 project (Please Google It for more details).
They built a car with hybrid
technology, which they’d never done before, the car cost eight times as much as
any of their normal models, and they limited production to 918 units.
But what they built was truly
remarkable, the car caught major attention for it’s space-style design and also set
an all time record on the Nurburgring.
The car completely sold out.
It’s your choice.
You can never take risks, and never
build something that’s so great everyone will eventually want it, or you can
work at the edge, occasionally fall, but rise all the higher in the long run.
Lesson
3: If you want your product to successfully reach the masses, focus on
early adopters first.
When I hear the word early
adopters, I always have to think of Simon Sinek and his talk.
The gist of it is that you need to
communicate why you do things (Purpose) before you tell people what you
do, because that’ll help get your product into the right people’s hands.
In both Seth’s and Simon’s case,
these people are called early adopters.
Traditional marketing shoots
its advertising right at the majority of people, when a new product comes
out. The mistake with this is that the majority isn’t ready for it yet
– they want a proven product, not some new gimmick
.
Instead, build your product in a way
that makes it attractive to innovators and early adopters, the tech
geeks, the people that stand in line for 24 hours to buy an iPhone, and let
them spread the word
.
When you do this and make sure that
your product is easily shareable, you’ll make sure your product eventually
reaches the masses through diffusion, and they won’t turn you down at the door.
The essence of the Purple Cow is about
being remarkable.  Remarkable products are worth talking about.  They
get noticed.  They’re exceptional, new, and interesting.  Remarkable
in marketing means that the product or service remarkable.  In that sense,
marketing isn’t an add on, but a part of the product cycle as well.  Godin
emphasizes that if it isn’t remarkable, it’s invisible.  It’s a brown or
white cow.  His Purple
Cow
 is about three pertinent
ideas: the why, the what, and the how of being remarkable.

1. Why be remarkable

The author states, using rational argument
and case examples, that being remarkable is a necessity of marketing.  His
“TV-industrial complex” system, is dying or dead.  Consumers are hard to
reach and they ignore mass advertising.  Godin offers multiple examples of
this (Please read book for the examples, they are worth reading).  Most
notable is the, often called, most popularly know television ad ever made: “I’d
like to teach the world to sing” by Coca-Cola.  Godin cites works of other
which argue that the commercial sold “not one more bottle of Coke.” 

2. What is remarkable

Godin lists some products or services
which are remarkable: Starbucks, Jet Blue, Sam Adams, and others. 
Remarkable is the insight to realize that there is no other choice to grow a
business or launch a product.  Passion is not a requisite.  Neither
is an extreme amount of creativity.  Godin gives the reader an
interestingly non-marketing example of remarkable: kiteboarding.  It is
one of the fastest growing sports today.  “Strap a surfboard to your feet,
hold onto a huge kite, and start racing across the water at thirty miles per
hour.  Unless, of course, you get dragged across the beach.” Dangerous and
new are worth talking about.  Remarkable is worth talking about.  It
is exceptional and worth noticing.

3. How to be remarkable

This is the core material of Purple Cow, literally and
figuratively.  It is the heftiest part of the book, and is filled with
case examples and stories (Please read the book for all the examples).  It
is, however, more of a listing of what not to do than what to do.  Godin’s
“how’s” become increasingly abstract, but three core beliefs stand out.
  • Firms must make more remarkable products and
    services that the “right” people (Micro niche segment of customers) seek
    out.  Creating safe and ordinary products and combining them with
    great marketing no longer works.
  • Purple Cows focus on early adopters
    of products.  Brown cows focus on the masses in the middle of the
    product life cycle.  But the masses also ignore new products. 
    The majority are happy with their choices and unlikely to change. 
    They are stuck consumers.
  • Beyond catering to the early adopters, Purple
    Cows can use them to spread ideas.  Godin calls them “idea viruses”
    and vocal early adopters “sneezers.”  They sneeze products and ideas
    and their friends catch on.  Ideasvirus items are occasionally the
    product of accidental luck; consider the Pet Rock and Psy’s Gangnam Style
    video.  More likely, however, it is the result of hard work and a
    focus on sneezers.  In fact, Godin states “It is useless to advertise
    to anyone except interested sneezers with influence.” 

Lessons learned

Purple Cow products are rare because they
are seen as risky, like kiteboarding.  The real problem with them is
fear.  Giant brands with large facilities and significant inertia have a
low tolerance for perceived risk.  Smaller and mid sized firms have less
to lose.  And, they realize they have far more to gain by playing by a
different set of marketing and conceptual rules.  Godin calls them
“cheaters.”  One example is Jet Blue.  They “cheat” by using a low
cost business structure, underused airports, and a younger non-union
staff.  This gives them an unfair advantage.  His take on this is
“who cares?”
“If Purple Cow is now
one of the Ps of marketing, it has profound implications for the enterprise. It
changes the definition of marketing. It used to be that Engineering invented,
Manufacturing built, Marketing marketed, and Sales sold. There was a clear
division of labor, and the president managed the whole shebang.” That’s clearly
not a valid strategy any longer the customer’s mind, creating Killer Brands.

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Purple Cow (Book Summary) : New era Marketing by being Purple cow

New era Marketing by being Purple cow
Image result for the purple cow
The Purple cow

Here are 3 lessons from the book:
  1. We live
    in the third era of advertising, where marketing is mainly done
    through word-of-mouth.
  2. Not
    taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
  3. If you
    want your product to succeed, focus on early adopters as your first
    customers.
Lesson
1: Today marketing is mainly done through word-of-mouth recommendations.
Seth walks us through the history of
advertising and says there were three distinct periods.
Before advertising was way back in ancient times, when people could
only spread the word about great deals with their mouths.
For example in ancient Rome, when
one of the vendors on the market sold particularly good fish, everyone who
bought one would of course tell all their friends and family. Likely, the next
time they’d go to the market, they’d visit that same vendor.
During advertising was the time during the 18- and 19-hundreds, when
advertising seemed to work like magic and the only limit to how much you could
sell through it was how much you were able to buy. Billboards, ads in
magazines, TV commercials, they all fall into this category.
But by now we’re in the era after
advertising. 
Consumers completely ignore ads now and are already
blind to banner ads online. Unless they’re looking for something specific,
for example a car, people won’t look at car ads.
In the era we are in right now,
we’ve gone back to word-of-mouth marketing, only that the word is now exchanged
online, which makes news about good and bad products spread a lot more quickly, thanks
to social media like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.
Lesson
2: Not taking risks is riskier than taking risks.
Because we live in a
post-advertising world and the internet is such a noisy place, you have to be
truly remarkable to stand out – like a purple cow among brown, black and white
cows.
Seth calls this remarkable marketing
and without it, your product is doomed to fail.
That’s why the riskiest thing you
and your company can do right now, is to not take any risks at all.
Following the trends and trying not
to make any noise, won’t make you stand out, it will make you invisible.
For example, Ford is a steady
company, but they’re not very innovative. They do what they know to do, again
and again, which is why their stock price has merely changed in 10 years. They’re
a boring company.
Take Porsche, and you see a company
that’s always at the edge. In 2013, Porsche took a massive risk with the
918 project (Please Google It for more details).
They built a car with hybrid
technology, which they’d never done before, the car cost eight times as much as
any of their normal models, and they limited production to 918 units.
But what they built was truly
remarkable, the car caught major attention for it’s space-style design and also set
an all time record on the Nurburgring.
The car completely sold out.
It’s your choice.
You can never take risks, and never
build something that’s so great everyone will eventually want it, or you can
work at the edge, occasionally fall, but rise all the higher in the long run.
Lesson
3: If you want your product to successfully reach the masses, focus on
early adopters first.
When I hear the word early
adopters, I always have to think of Simon Sinek and his talk.
The gist of it is that you need to
communicate why you do things (Purpose) before you tell people what you
do, because that’ll help get your product into the right people’s hands.
In both Seth’s and Simon’s case,
these people are called early adopters.
Traditional marketing shoots
its advertising right at the majority of people, when a new product comes
out. The mistake with this is that the majority isn’t ready for it yet
– they want a proven product, not some new gimmick
.
Instead, build your product in a way
that makes it attractive to innovators and early adopters, the tech
geeks, the people that stand in line for 24 hours to buy an iPhone, and let
them spread the word
.
When you do this and make sure that
your product is easily shareable, you’ll make sure your product eventually
reaches the masses through diffusion, and they won’t turn you down at the door.
The essence of the Purple Cow is about
being remarkable.  Remarkable products are worth talking about.  They
get noticed.  They’re exceptional, new, and interesting.  Remarkable
in marketing means that the product or service remarkable.  In that sense,
marketing isn’t an add on, but a part of the product cycle as well.  Godin
emphasizes that if it isn’t remarkable, it’s invisible.  It’s a brown or
white cow.  His Purple
Cow
 is about three pertinent
ideas: the why, the what, and the how of being remarkable.

1. Why be remarkable

The author states, using rational argument
and case examples, that being remarkable is a necessity of marketing.  His
“TV-industrial complex” system, is dying or dead.  Consumers are hard to
reach and they ignore mass advertising.  Godin offers multiple examples of
this (Please read book for the examples, they are worth reading).  Most
notable is the, often called, most popularly know television ad ever made: “I’d
like to teach the world to sing” by Coca-Cola.  Godin cites works of other
which argue that the commercial sold “not one more bottle of Coke.” 

2. What is remarkable

Godin lists some products or services
which are remarkable: Starbucks, Jet Blue, Sam Adams, and others. 
Remarkable is the insight to realize that there is no other choice to grow a
business or launch a product.  Passion is not a requisite.  Neither
is an extreme amount of creativity.  Godin gives the reader an
interestingly non-marketing example of remarkable: kiteboarding.  It is
one of the fastest growing sports today.  “Strap a surfboard to your feet,
hold onto a huge kite, and start racing across the water at thirty miles per
hour.  Unless, of course, you get dragged across the beach.” Dangerous and
new are worth talking about.  Remarkable is worth talking about.  It
is exceptional and worth noticing.

3. How to be remarkable

This is the core material of Purple Cow, literally and
figuratively.  It is the heftiest part of the book, and is filled with
case examples and stories (Please read the book for all the examples).  It
is, however, more of a listing of what not to do than what to do.  Godin’s
“how’s” become increasingly abstract, but three core beliefs stand out.
  • Firms must make more remarkable products and
    services that the “right” people (Micro niche segment of customers) seek
    out.  Creating safe and ordinary products and combining them with
    great marketing no longer works.
  • Purple Cows focus on early adopters
    of products.  Brown cows focus on the masses in the middle of the
    product life cycle.  But the masses also ignore new products. 
    The majority are happy with their choices and unlikely to change. 
    They are stuck consumers.
  • Beyond catering to the early adopters, Purple
    Cows can use them to spread ideas.  Godin calls them “idea viruses”
    and vocal early adopters “sneezers.”  They sneeze products and ideas
    and their friends catch on.  Ideasvirus items are occasionally the
    product of accidental luck; consider the Pet Rock and Psy’s Gangnam Style
    video.  More likely, however, it is the result of hard work and a
    focus on sneezers.  In fact, Godin states “It is useless to advertise
    to anyone except interested sneezers with influence.” 

Lessons learned

Purple Cow products are rare because they
are seen as risky, like kiteboarding.  The real problem with them is
fear.  Giant brands with large facilities and significant inertia have a
low tolerance for perceived risk.  Smaller and mid sized firms have less
to lose.  And, they realize they have far more to gain by playing by a
different set of marketing and conceptual rules.  Godin calls them
“cheaters.”  One example is Jet Blue.  They “cheat” by using a low
cost business structure, underused airports, and a younger non-union
staff.  This gives them an unfair advantage.  His take on this is
“who cares?”

“If Purple Cow is now
one of the Ps of marketing, it has profound implications for the enterprise. It
changes the definition of marketing. It used to be that Engineering invented,
Manufacturing built, Marketing marketed, and Sales sold. There was a clear
division of labor, and the president managed the whole shebang.” That’s clearly
not a valid strategy any longer the customer’s mind, creating Killer Brands.

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Inventory Management means saving Money

Start saving by using these 

8 Inventory Management Techniques

Image result for inventory problems

Why Inventory Management Is Important

Holding inventory ties up a lot of cash. That’s why good inventory management is crucial for growing a company. Just like cash flow, it can make or break your business. 

Inventory Management Saves You Money

Good inventory management saves you money in a few critical ways:
Avoid Spoilage
If you’re selling a product that has an expiry date (like food or makeup), there’s a very real chance it will go bad if you don’t sell it in time. Solid inventory management helps you avoid unnecessary spoilage.
Avoid Dead Stock
Dead stock is stock that can no longer be sold, but not necessarily because it expired. It could have gone out of season, out of style, or otherwise become irrelevant. By managing your inventory better, you can avoid dead stock.
Save on Storage Costs
Warehousing is often a variable cost, meaning it fluctuates based on how much product you’re storing. When you store too much product at once or end up with a product that’s difficult to sell, your storage costs will go up. Avoiding this will save you money.

Inventory Management Improves Cash Flow

Not only does good inventory management save you money, it also improves cash flow in other ways. Remember, inventory is product that you’ve likely already paid for with cash (checks and electronic transfers count as cash too), and you’re going to sell it for cash, but while it’s sitting in your warehouse it is definitively not cash. Just try paying your landlord with 500 iPhone cases.
This is why it’s important to factor inventory into your cash flow management. It affects both sales (by dictating how much you can sell), and expenses (by dictating what you have to buy). Both of these things factor heavily into how much cash you have on hand. Better inventory management leads to better cash flow management.
When you have a solid inventory system, you’ll know exactly how much product you have, and based on sales, you can project when you’ll run out and make sure you replace it on time. Not only does this make sure you don’t lose sales (critical for cash flow), but it also helps you plan ahead for buying more so you can ensure you have enough cash set aside.

8 Inventory Management Techniques

Inventory management is a highly customizable part of doing business. The optimal system is different for each company. However, every business should strive to remove human error from inventory management as much as possible. This means taking of advantage inventory management software. If you run your business with Shopify, inventory management is already built in.
Regardless of the system you use, the following eight techniques to will help you improve your inventory management—and cash flow.

1. Set Par Levels

Make inventory management easier by setting “par levels” for each of your products. Par levels are the minimum amount of product that must be on hand at all times. When your inventory stock dips below the predetermined levels, you know it’s time to order more.
Ideally, you’ll typically order the minimum quantity that will get you back above par. Par levels will vary by product based on how quickly the item sells, and how long it takes to get back in stock.
Although it requires some research and decision-making up front, setting par levels will systemize the process of ordering. Not only will it make it easier for you to make decisions quickly, it will allow your staff to make decisions on your behalf. 
Remember that conditions change over time. Check on par levels a few times throughout the year to confirm they still make sense. If something changes in the meantime, don’t be afraid to adjust your par levels up or down.

2. First-In First-Out (FIFO)

“First-in, first-out” is an important principle of inventory management. It means that your oldest stock (first-in) gets sold first (first-out), not your newest stock. This is particularly important for perishable products so you don’t end up with unsellable spoilage.
It’s also a good idea to practice FIFO for non-perishable products. If the same boxes are always sitting at the back, they’re more likely to get worn out. Plus, packaging design and features often change over time. You don’t want to end up with something obsolete that you can’t sell.
In order to manage a FIFO system, you’ll need an organized warehouse. This typically means adding new products from the back, or otherwise making sure old product stays at the front. If you’re working with a warehousing and fulfillment company they probably do this already, but it’s a good idea to call them to confirm.

3. Manage Relationships

Part of successful inventory management is being able to adapt quickly. Whether you need to return a slow selling item to make room for a new product, restock a fast seller very quickly, troubleshoot manufacturing issues, or temporarily expand your storage space, it’s important to have a good relationship with your suppliers. That way they’ll be more willing to work with you to solve problems.
In particular, having a good relationship with your product suppliers goes a long way. Minimum order quantities are often negotiable. Don’t be afraid to ask for a lower minimum so you don’t have to carry as much inventory. 
A good relationship isn’t just about being friendly. It’s about good communication. Let your supplier know when you’re expecting an increase in sales so they can adjust production. Have them let you know when a product is running behind schedule so you can pause promotions or look for a temporary substitute.

4. Contingency Planning

A lot of issues can pop up related to inventory management. These types of problems can cripple unprepared businesses. For example:
  • Your sales spike unexpectedly and you oversell your stock
  • You run into a cash flow shortfall and can’t pay for product you desperately need
  • Your warehouse doesn’t have enough room to accommodate your seasonal spike in sales
  • A miscalculation in inventory means you have less product than you thought
  • A slow moving product takes up all your storage space 
  • Your manufacturer runs out of your product and you have orders to fill
  • Your manufacturer discontinues your product without warning
It’s not a matter of if problems arise, but when. Figure out where your risks area and prepare a contingency plan. How will you react? What steps will you take to solve the problem? How will this impact other parts of your business? Remember that solid relationships go a long way here.

5. Regular Auditing

Regular reconciliation is vital. In most cases, you’ll be relying on software and reports from your warehouse to know how much product you have stock. However, it’s important to make sure that the facts matche up. There are several methods for doing this.
Physical Inventory
A physical inventory is the practice is counting all your inventory at once. Many businesses do this at their year-end because it ties in with accounting and filing income tax. Although physical inventories are typically only done once a year, it can be incredibly disruptive to the business, and believe me, it’s tedious. If you do find a discrepancy, it can be difficult to pinpoint the issue when you’re looking back at an entire year.
Spot Checking
If you do a full physical inventory at the end of the year and you often run into problems, or you have a lot of products, you may want to start spot checking throughout the year. This simply means choosing a product, counting it, and comparing the number to what it’s supposed to be. This isn’t done on a schedule and is supplemental to physical inventory. In particular, you may want to spot check problematic or fast-moving products.
Cycle Counting
Instead of doing a full physical inventory, some businesses use cycle counting to audit their inventory. Rather than a full count at year-end, cycle counting spreads reconciliation throughout the year. Each day, week, or month a different product is checked on a rotating schedule. There are different methods of determining which items to count when, but, generally speaking, items of higher value will be counted more frequently.

6. Prioritize With ABC

Some products need more attention than others. Use an ABC analysis to prioritize your inventory management. Separate out products that require a lot of attention from those that don’t. Do this by going through your product list and adding each product to one of three categories:
A – high-value products with a low frequency of sales
B – moderate value products with a moderate frequency of sales
C – low-value products with a high frequency of sales

Items in category A require regular attention because their financial impact is significant but sales are unpredictable. Items in category C require less oversight because they have a smaller financial impact and they’re constantly turning over. Items in category B fall somewhere in-between.

7. Accurate Forecasting

A huge part of good inventory management comes down to accurately predicting demand. Make no mistake, this is incredibly hard to do. There are so many variables involved and you’ll never know for sure exactly what’s coming—but you can get close. Here are a few things to look at when projecting your future sales:
  • Trends in the market
  • Last year’s sales during the same week
  • This year’s growth rate
  • Guaranteed sales from contracts and subscriptions
  • Seasonality and the overall economy
  • Upcoming promotions
  • Planned ad spend
If there’s something else that will help you create a more accurate forecast, be sure to include it.

8. Consider Dropshipping

Dropshipping is really the ideal scenario from an inventory management perspective. Instead of having to carry inventory and ship products yourself—whether internally or through third-party logistics—the manufacturer or wholesaler takes care of it for you. Basically, you completely remove inventory management from your business.
Many wholesalers and manufacturers advertise dropshipping as a service, but even if your supplier doesn’t, it may still be an option. Don’t be afraid to ask. Although products often cost more this way than they do in bulk orders, you don’t have to worry about expenses related to holding inventory, storage, and fulfillment. 
It’s time to take control of your inventory management and stop losing money. Choose the right inventory management techniques for your business, and start implementing them today.
Credit: Casandra Campbell is an entrepreneur, craft beer nerd, and content creator at Shopify. for sharing the wonderful details. 

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Book: Swami Vivekananda’s Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers by ARK Sharma on how to be successful Manager

S W A M I V I V E K A N A N D A’s 
Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers 

– A.R.K Sharma


About the Author:

Mr. A.R.K Sharma, a gold medalist in science. He is a UPSC recruited class 1 officer. At present he is the vice president of Tata Docomo Services. He has been always influenced by Swami Vivekanadha and his writings. He has authored up to 14 books which are best sellers

Swami Vivekanadha:



Born as Narendra Dutta, he was a disciple of Ramakrishna. He died at the early age of 39. He is well-known for his speech at the Parliament of World Religions in Chicago, 1893 which he began with the most famous words as “Sisters and Brothers of America”




Why this Book?

To Analyse and increase our commitment for our success.

Characteristic of people :


1) People with Low commitment and Low competency – like COLORLESS and ODORLESS FLOWERS

a) Always require monitoring, guidance, cause of correction to perform anything constructive.
b) They are like colorless and odorless flowers.
c) They are simple in nature.



2) People with High commitment and Low competency – Like COLORLESS BUT SCENTED FLOWERS

a) They work hard with little success.
b) They are good in ratline & repetitive matters.
c) Colorless flowers but with excellent fragrance.



3) People with High competency and low commitment – Like COLORFUL without FRAGRANCE FLOWERS

a) They are extra ordinary brilliant and have excellent competency.
b) Lake of commitment makes unsuccessful in spite of competency.
c) They are like flowers with beautiful colors but without fragrance.




4) People with high commitment & high competency – Like COLORFUL with FRAGRANCE FLOWERS

a) They are gift of God. The more such people will bring glory to society.
b) They are like flowers with beautiful colors and excellent fragrance.

Commitment Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:

1) Commitment – Early Awakening

Winning Formula – ARISE! AWAKE! STOP NOT TILL THE GOAL IS REACHED

The passion to execute plans and achieve results is the fundamental factor in successful people.


2) Commitment – Sense of Responsibility

Winning Formula – BLAME NONE FOR YOUR OWN FAULTS 

Never talk about the faults of others ,no matter how bad they may be.



3) Commitment – Focus on Execution of Work

Winning Formula – WORK, WORK, WORK — LET THIS BE YOUR MOTTO


4) Commitment – Zeal

Winning Formula – IF YOU FAIL A THOUSAND TIMES, MAKE ATTEMPT ONCE MORE

       What is done is done … do not
repent; do not brood over past deeds… you can not undo, the effect must come,
face it, but be careful never to do the same thing.

5) Commitment – Commitment to Others

Winning Formula – WHEN THERE IS A CONFLICT BETWEENHEART AND BRAIN,LET THE HEART BE FOLLOWED

We should break our narrow mindedness and stand by heart at the time of crisis.















Hear our former president’s vision about Swami Vivekananda




Competence Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:

1) Competence – Courage

Winning Formula – STOP RUNNING – FACE THE BRUTES


Face the challenges with courage instead of running away from it












2) Competence – Faith 

Winning Formula – FAITH, FAITH, FAITH IN OURSELVES

1.         
The faith is oneself is the
fundamental factor to win. This winning formula of Swami Vivekananda empowers
us to move forward in life and attain success. Whatever we think , that we will
be. If we think we are weak, weak we will be




3) Competence – Self Respect

Winning Formula – EYE FOR EYE; TOOTH FOR TOOTH; BUT DO NOT DO ANYTHING WRONG

Many times fear stops us from going ahead and we strangely back out accepting failure in ignorant manner













4) Competence – Focus of mind

Winning Formula – FULL ATTENTION; NO TENSION


The secret of work is to work without being drawn away in tension and worry

“Chita burn dead body and chinta burns living body”








5) Competence – Strength

Winning Formula – STRENGTH, STRENGTH, STRENGTH, IT IS THAT WE WANT MORE IN HIS LIFE


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Book: Swami Vivekananda’s Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers by ARK Sharma on how to be successful Manager

S W A M I V I V E K A N A N D A’s 
Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers 

– A.R.K Sharma


About the Author:

Mr. A.R.K Sharma, a gold medalist in science. He is a UPSC recruited class 1 officer. At present he is the vice president of Tata Docomo Services. He has been always influenced by Swami Vivekanadha and his writings. He has authored up to 14 books which are best sellers

Swami Vivekanadha:



Born as Narendra Dutta, he was a disciple of Ramakrishna. He died at the early age of 39. He is well-known for his speech at the Parliament of World Religions in Chicago, 1893 which he began with the most famous words as “Sisters and Brothers of America”




Why this Book?

To Analyse and increase our commitment for our success.

Characteristic of people :


1) People with Low commitment and Low competency – like COLORLESS and ODORLESS FLOWERS

a) Always require monitoring, guidance, cause of correction to perform anything constructive.
b) They are like colorless and odorless flowers.
c) They are simple in nature.



2) People with High commitment and Low competency – Like COLORLESS BUT SCENTED FLOWERS

a) They work hard with little success.
b) They are good in ratline & repetitive matters.
c) Colorless flowers but with excellent fragrance.



3) People with High competency and low commitment – Like COLORFUL without FRAGRANCE FLOWERS

a) They are extra ordinary brilliant and have excellent competency.
b) Lake of commitment makes unsuccessful in spite of competency.
c) They are like flowers with beautiful colors but without fragrance.




4) People with high commitment & high competency – Like COLORFUL with FRAGRANCE FLOWERS

a) They are gift of God. The more such people will bring glory to society.
b) They are like flowers with beautiful colors and excellent fragrance.

Commitment Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:

1) Commitment – Early Awakening

Winning Formula – ARISE! AWAKE! STOP NOT TILL THE GOAL IS REACHED

The passion to execute plans and achieve results is the fundamental factor in successful people.


2) Commitment – Sense of Responsibility

Winning Formula – BLAME NONE FOR YOUR OWN FAULTS 

Never talk about the faults of others ,no matter how bad they may be.



3) Commitment – Focus on Execution of Work

Winning Formula – WORK, WORK, WORK — LET THIS BE YOUR MOTTO


4) Commitment – Zeal

Winning Formula – IF YOU FAIL A THOUSAND TIMES, MAKE ATTEMPT ONCE MORE

       What is done is done … do not
repent; do not brood over past deeds… you can not undo, the effect must come,
face it, but be careful never to do the same thing.

5) Commitment – Commitment to Others

Winning Formula – WHEN THERE IS A CONFLICT BETWEENHEART AND BRAIN,LET THE HEART BE FOLLOWED

We should break our narrow mindedness and stand by heart at the time of crisis.















Hear our former president’s vision about Swami Vivekananda




Competence Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:

1) Competence – Courage

Winning Formula – STOP RUNNING – FACE THE BRUTES


Face the challenges with courage instead of running away from it












2) Competence – Faith 

Winning Formula – FAITH, FAITH, FAITH IN OURSELVES

1.         
The faith is oneself is the
fundamental factor to win. This winning formula of Swami Vivekananda empowers
us to move forward in life and attain success. Whatever we think , that we will
be. If we think we are weak, weak we will be




3) Competence – Self Respect

Winning Formula – EYE FOR EYE; TOOTH FOR TOOTH; BUT DO NOT DO ANYTHING WRONG

Many times fear stops us from going ahead and we strangely back out accepting failure in ignorant manner













4) Competence – Focus of mind

Winning Formula – FULL ATTENTION; NO TENSION


The secret of work is to work without being drawn away in tension and worry

“Chita burn dead body and chinta burns living body”








5) Competence – Strength

Winning Formula – STRENGTH, STRENGTH, STRENGTH, IT IS THAT WE WANT MORE IN HIS LIFE


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Book: Swami Vivekananda’s Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers by ARK Sharma on how to be successful Manager

S W A M I V I V E K A N A N D A’s 
Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers 

– A.R.K Sharma


About the Author:

Mr. A.R.K Sharma, a gold medalist in science. He is a UPSC recruited class 1 officer. At present he is the vice president of Tata Docomo Services. He has been always influenced by Swami Vivekanadha and his writings. He has authored up to 14 books which are best sellers

Swami Vivekanadha:



Born as Narendra Dutta, he was a disciple of Ramakrishna. He died at the early age of 39. He is well-known for his speech at the Parliament of World Religions in Chicago, 1893 which he began with the most famous words as “Sisters and Brothers of America”




Why this Book?

To Analyse and increase our commitment for our success.

Characteristic of people :


1) People with Low commitment and Low competency – like COLORLESS and ODORLESS FLOWERS

a) Always require monitoring, guidance, cause of correction to perform anything constructive.
b) They are like colorless and odorless flowers.
c) They are simple in nature.



2) People with High commitment and Low competency – Like COLORLESS BUT SCENTED FLOWERS

a) They work hard with little success.
b) They are good in ratline & repetitive matters.
c) Colorless flowers but with excellent fragrance.



3) People with High competency and low commitment – Like COLORFUL without FRAGRANCE FLOWERS

a) They are extra ordinary brilliant and have excellent competency.
b) Lake of commitment makes unsuccessful in spite of competency.
c) They are like flowers with beautiful colors but without fragrance.




4) People with high commitment & high competency – Like COLORFUL with FRAGRANCE FLOWERS

a) They are gift of God. The more such people will bring glory to society.
b) They are like flowers with beautiful colors and excellent fragrance.

Commitment Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:

1) Commitment – Early Awakening

Winning Formula – ARISE! AWAKE! STOP NOT TILL THE GOAL IS REACHED

The passion to execute plans and achieve results is the fundamental factor in successful people.


2) Commitment – Sense of Responsibility

Winning Formula – BLAME NONE FOR YOUR OWN FAULTS 

Never talk about the faults of others ,no matter how bad they may be.



3) Commitment – Focus on Execution of Work

Winning Formula – WORK, WORK, WORK — LET THIS BE YOUR MOTTO


4) Commitment – Zeal

Winning Formula – IF YOU FAIL A THOUSAND TIMES, MAKE ATTEMPT ONCE MORE

       What is done is done … do not
repent; do not brood over past deeds… you can not undo, the effect must come,
face it, but be careful never to do the same thing.

5) Commitment – Commitment to Others

Winning Formula – WHEN THERE IS A CONFLICT BETWEENHEART AND BRAIN,LET THE HEART BE FOLLOWED

We should break our narrow mindedness and stand by heart at the time of crisis.















Hear our former president’s vision about Swami Vivekananda




Competence Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:

1) Competence – Courage

Winning Formula – STOP RUNNING – FACE THE BRUTES


Face the challenges with courage instead of running away from it












2) Competence – Faith 

Winning Formula – FAITH, FAITH, FAITH IN OURSELVES

1.         
The faith is oneself is the
fundamental factor to win. This winning formula of Swami Vivekananda empowers
us to move forward in life and attain success. Whatever we think , that we will
be. If we think we are weak, weak we will be




3) Competence – Self Respect

Winning Formula – EYE FOR EYE; TOOTH FOR TOOTH; BUT DO NOT DO ANYTHING WRONG

Many times fear stops us from going ahead and we strangely back out accepting failure in ignorant manner













4) Competence – Focus of mind

Winning Formula – FULL ATTENTION; NO TENSION


The secret of work is to work without being drawn away in tension and worry

“Chita burn dead body and chinta burns living body”








5) Competence – Strength

Winning Formula – STRENGTH, STRENGTH, STRENGTH, IT IS THAT WE WANT MORE IN HIS LIFE


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Book: Swami Vivekananda’s Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers by ARK Sharma on how to be successful Manager

S W A M I V I V E K A N A N D A’s 
Winning Formulas to become Successful Managers 
 
– A.R.K Sharma
 
 
About the Author:
 
Mr. A.R.K Sharma, a gold medalist in science. He is a UPSC recruited class 1 officer. At present he is the vice president of Tata Docomo Services. He has been always influenced by Swami Vivekanadha and his writings. He has authored up to 14 books which are best sellers
 
Swami Vivekanadha:
 


Born as Narendra Dutta, he was a disciple of Ramakrishna. He died at the early age of 39. He is well-known for his speech at the Parliament of World Religions in Chicago, 1893 which he began with the most famous words as “Sisters and Brothers of America”

 
Why this Book?
 
To Analyse and increase our commitment for our success.
 
Characteristic of people :

1) People with Low commitment and Low competency – like COLORLESS and ODORLESS FLOWERS

 
a) Always require monitoring, guidance, cause of correction to perform anything constructive.
b) They are like colorless and odorless flowers.
c) They are simple in nature.


2) People with High commitment and Low competency – Like COLORLESS BUT SCENTED FLOWERS
 
a) They work hard with little success.
b) They are good in ratline & repetitive matters.
c) Colorless flowers but with excellent fragrance.



3) People with High competency and low commitment – Like COLORFUL without FRAGRANCE FLOWERS
 
a) They are extra ordinary brilliant and have excellent competency.
b) Lake of commitment makes unsuccessful in spite of competency.
c) They are like flowers with beautiful colors but without fragrance.

4) People with high commitment & high competency – Like COLORFUL with FRAGRANCE FLOWERS
 
a) They are gift of God. The more such people will bring glory to society.
b) They are like flowers with beautiful colors and excellent fragrance.
Commitment Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:
 
1) Commitment – Early Awakening
 
Winning Formula – ARISE! AWAKE! STOP NOT TILL THE GOAL IS REACHED
 

The passion to execute plans and achieve results is the fundamental factor in successful people.

 
2) Commitment – Sense of Responsibility
 
Winning Formula – BLAME NONE FOR YOUR OWN FAULTS 
Image result for BLAME NONE FOR YOUR OWN FAULTS

Never talk about the faults of others ,no matter how bad they may be.

 
 
3) Commitment – Focus on Execution of Work
 
Winning Formula – WORK, WORK, WORK — LET THIS BE YOUR MOTTO
 
 
4) Commitment – Zeal
 
Winning Formula – IF YOU FAIL A THOUSAND TIMES, MAKE ATTEMPT ONCE MORE
 
     What is done is done … do not repent; do not brood over past deeds… you can not undo, the effect must come, face it, but be careful never to do the same thing.
5) Commitment – Commitment to Others
 
Winning Formula – WHEN THERE IS A CONFLICT BETWEENHEART AND BRAIN,LET THE HEART BE FOLLOWED
 
We should break our narrow mindedness and stand by heart at the time of crisis.
 
 
Hear our former president’s vision about Swami Vivekananda
 
 
 
Competence Winning formulas as said by Swami Vivekanadha:
 
1) Competence – Courage
 
Winning Formula – STOP RUNNING – FACE THE BRUTES
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Face the challenges with courage instead of running away from it

 

2) Competence – Faith 
 
Winning Formula – FAITH, FAITH, FAITH IN OURSELVES
 
1.
The faith is oneself is the fundamental factor to win. This winning formula of Swami Vivekananda empowers us to move forward in life and attain success. Whatever we think , that we will be. If we think we are weak, weak we will be
 
3) Competence – Self Respect
 
Winning Formula – EYE FOR EYE; TOOTH FOR TOOTH; BUT DO NOT DO ANYTHING WRONG
Image result for time to respect your self

Many times fear stops us from going ahead and we strangely back out accepting failure in ignorant manner

4) Competence – Focus of mind
 
Winning Formula – FULL ATTENTION; NO TENSION

The secret of work is to work without being drawn away in tension and worry

 

 

“Chita burn dead body and chinta burns living body”
5) Competence – Strength
Winning Formula – STRENGTH, STRENGTH, STRENGTH, IT IS THAT WE WANT MORE IN HIS LIFE
 

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